Rayen Castle: the second largest castle in Iran

September 4, 2019
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What makes the ancient buildings, structures, monuments and cave remarkable are their strength that they carry along with the resistance power that have made them stand in the face of the test of time. Rayen Castle in Kerman internally registered as the second largest castle after Bam Citadel

If you are planning to visit to Kerman in Iran, or think of visiting it later, your visit to this castle will take you through the history  that help you gaining some insight about the place.

Location

Rayen Castle is situated 100 Kilometers south of Kerman province, Iran. It is situated on the edge of the mountain Hezar. The mud brick city of Rayen is like Arg-e Bam that was damaged in the face of earthquakes in the last part of 2003. Rayen manifests  all the elements of the architecture of a deserted castle.

At over 22,000 square meters, the well equipped castle is situated comfortably. It is supposed to be dated back from the Sassanid era. Other citadels in the location and with the same age have been ruined because of the  natural disasters.

How it was named

This second largest mud brick construction was named after famed Arg-e Bam, in the world, Rayen Castle in Kerman attracts huge number of  tourists from across the world.

The primary occupation

The ancient Rayen city, on the east-west road and on the Kerman-Jiroft-Bandar Abbas route, was a hub for the trade and commerce in the era of Sassanid.

The fortification around the castle is more than 10 meters in height. The only doorway is located on the east with a big doorway gate.

What are there in the citadel?

With sections like market, stalls, Zoor Khaneh, noblemen quartet and public quarter, the citadel’s function was complete with an armory where weapons like the sword and rifle were manufactured.

The massive castle provided housing of different classes of people of the society: right from farmers to tradesmen,  to courtiers and priests and so on

But the stonework and even the supplies for each part were obviously unique. Watchtowers controlled the area and making it as unbeatable as possible.

Review #2

The second largest mud-brick structure, after famed Arg-e Bam, in the world, Rayen Castle in Kerman draws thousands of tourists from around the world.

The ancient Rayen city, on the west-east thoroughfare and on Kerman-Jiroft-Bandar Abbas route, was a centerpiece for trading and commerce in the Sassanid era.

At over 22,000 square meters, the fortified castle is nestled atop a hill. It is believed that it dates from Sassanid era. Other fortresses in the site with the same age have been destroyed as a result of natural disasters.

Arg-e Rayen was Mirza Hussein Khan’s headquarter in Zand’s dynasty; and perhaps that’s why it is also known as Hussein Khan’s citadel. The square-shape stronghold holds several towers around. The rampart around Arg exceeds 10 meters in height. The only portal is located on east with a huge entrance gate. With sections like market, stalls, Zoor Khaneh, noblemen quartet and public quarter, the citadel’s function was complete with an armory where weapons like sword and rifle were manufactured.  The massive castle housed people of different social classes; from tradesmen and farmers, to courtiers and Zoroastrian priests. But the masonry and even materials for each part were noticeably distinctive. Watch towers dominated the area; making it as unconquerable as possible. Of note are spiral stairs inside the castle.

A residentially-appropriate castle was dwelled until 150 years ago; some renovations took place in 1995 thereby its market, storehouses, and Zoor Khaneh were mainly restored.

In Rayen’s restaurants and eateries fine foods are served.  There are inns nearby; but if you would prefer to stay in a luxurious hotel, you will have to return to Kerman.

Alleyways allowing free passage to one another and market lanes with chambers have been damaged with time; the patterns on walls are disappeared too. Nonetheless, visit to the castle is still a worthwhile excursion.

It is possible to see the site almost all year round; although spring and autumn are highly recommended.

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